Tutorial Power Chord Bahasa Indonesia | Power Chord Double 5th & Pedal Tone Riffs #double5th

Tutorial Power Chord Bahasa Indonesia | Power Chord Double 5th & Pedal Tone Riffs #double5th

January 31, 2020 1 By Sebastian Fry


Hello, Calon Rocker’s friends! In this episode, I will tell you an old topic, which is, Power Chords. I will tell you, why the power chord exists, WHO is Power Chord (I just did myself one better), and WHEN do we use the Power Chord. And is it true that power chord can be the substitute of any other chord? Let’s give it a shot. As we already know, family chord contains (in order): Major, minor, minor, Major, Major, minor, minor b5, back to Major. The chords started with Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si, Do. So, if Do=C, then they are C Major, D minor, E minor, F Major, G Major, A minor, B minor b5, then back to C Major. Let’s play all chords in the family by using Power Chord. Starting with C Major. This is when C Major chord’s notes played normally (1-3-5). And this is C Power Chord. I just showed you C Power Chord with double 5th. This means that the 5th note is played in 2 places, before the 1st note. The power chord is commonly played using C (1st) then G (5th). The power chord formula is 1st+5th, for now. 1 and 5, C and G. When we added an extra 5th (G) before the 1st (C), it will become a Double Fifth. The Double 5th sounds heavier than common Power Chords. That was for C Major. Let’s move to D minor. D minor that we know shaped like this in a barre chord, will be like this when played as a D Power Chord. Or… 1-5-1 or 1-5-1-5 and so on. Now we have a C Major, and a D minor. Let’s play both as power chords. So far so good. C and D. Move to E, E minor. This is the E power chord. This is the E minor. Move to F Major. As power chord, or like this. Ascend to G Major. This is the power chord. And this is the double 5th. Every second power chords examples earlier were followed by the double 5th examples. Which means we put the 5th before every 1st (the root). Now, A minor. The power chord. Or… The problem is when we’ve reached the B minor flat 5. It’s obvious that we’re using power chords to neglect the note that assembles the minor or Major chord. Which happens to be the 3rd note. We never played the 3rd note from the beginning of this video. So, when we play the B as the Si (7th), we don’t play the B power chord like this (B and F#). The power chord should be 1st plus 5th. Hard to see, eh? Here, it should’ve been played like this. I’m too lazy to get up. If we play the B power chord using the 1-5 formula, it’s against the concept. See, here… The 5th of B is F#. B and F#. Yet, there is no F# in the C Natural Major scale. How can we get our way around it? There are two common altered shapes. The 1st shape is treating it as a Major 7th shape. We play it like a C Power Chord, Which is C and G, but we shift the C to B. With the 5th stays in G. Or, we keep the B but move the G to F. All chords in C Family chords played as power chords will sound like this… I didn’t do it too fast, did I? If I did, just rewind then play it slower. But, I’ll play it slower anyway. And I’ll speak the chords’ names. This is C. In double 5th. If still not clear, I’ll put the tabs on my website, calonrocker.com. I’ll put the link below when I’m finished writing it. C D E F G A This the B we talked earlier. And back to C. Sounds cool, huh? Or… The concept is by keeping the B and substitute the other chords from the notes within the chord. This way you will not only use the power chords when needed, but also play it when it’s needed to add more color. For example, this simple chord progression… As simple as that, but when we use the previous example. Where we can flat the C to B. So we can use the B + the 5th in C Natural Major scale. More example of the chord progression using only power chords with the modified minor b5. Power chords also help when you have to play a complex chord progression and too fast to play using a full chord. Imagine if you have to play… Even those two chords only are quite challenging especially to those who haven’t master chords. For you that still finds moving from E minor to A minor is a hard task. Power chord will be the simplification for moving from E minor to A minor. Though, by using the power chords… The power chord will help you to deliver what chords you’re sending to your audience. But if you persist that you want the chords still sound as minor and Major, you can prediscussed that to your bassist or keyboardist to play the rest of the notes (except 1 and 5) to make the chord sounds full. Or, you can simply play… It’s easy to memorize the power chord. All that you have to remember is the root (the 1st note of the chord), let’s say in C. We add the 5th (5th note in C Major Scale), which is G, and play both notes simultaneously. And you can make it sounds heavier by adding the G before the root. Like this. Let’s compare this C Power Chord, with this C with double 5th. It sounds like it’s been played on a 7 strings guitar The actual place of this chord (the root) is not reachable on my 6 strings guitar. The C Power Chord is also known as C5 (for the use of the 5th). That’s also why the B is distinctive since it has b5. And, you can also move faster from G to C. For example, you play G here… to C here… without moving the G. You only have to move your pinky down (or other fingers you use). By learning power chords, not only we learn the chords, we can also learn how to make riffs. We’re talking about heavy metal riffs and beyond. And hard rock riffs and earlier. Because power chord is also a broken chord. Correct me if I’m wrong, but my opinion stands. Both power chord and broken chord share the same principal. Both play only some part of the whole chord. Let’s say when we play G like before… Then I can play the broken chord of G like this… Why is it sounds familiar? You can make riffs using the notes you already know. For example, you want to play in G, you’ll know that you can also play this note. Because it shares a similar note with the D power chord. Then you can play… You can get a ninth chord. Or… This is E add B, then F# Then back to here… then we get double 5th (F#-B-F#). This is the example of those notes combined. Play it freely! Power Chord is a chord (duh) so we can also play it as an arpeggio with a very simple formula 1-5-1-5-1 and repeat. For example… goes here… How wide it is! And here is the tricky part. Since it’s a B, and we didn’t include B in the formula. So you can either play that, or… I’ll put the tablature on my website We can also play it as the 9th arpeggio. So cool, huh? Even C# sounds in harmony. It’s somehow an “outside” note. Different topics (please write in the comment if I should make a video covering this “outside” topic). There are also some licks that you can play using power chords. The 1-5 notes. And you can also visit my website for the tabs. We can start here… When the C is in the key of C, then we play C and F. But, when the C is in the key of G, key of G, not G chord. This is C chord in the key of G. C – F# This is the longer version of the previous licks. Not hard, as long as we follow the 1-5-1-5 (and 4). Alternatively… Not bad, right? You can end it there too. The choice is yours as long as you keep the pattern and do your own experiment. You don’t have to play like what I showed you, you can also play 1-1-5. I just realized that he’s also using 1-1-5-1 but in a different position. I’ll keep trying this position so this tutorial doesn’t go off track (if it hasn’t). I’m not sure about this one-note. I haven’t had a chance to learn that song. Just trying to show how this lick is using the same formula. In the Metal genre, the use of Root is very common. Not Roots Bloody Roots, but the root of each chord. Which then be used as the pedal tone (means always going back to that note), I will give the example in E minor. We have a high E, D, C, and B. So we can play this… Imagine how hard it is to play that riff using a full chord. But, if you can, make a video then put the link in the comment section so I can watch it. It’s supposed to be easy. ’cause I’m a lazy ass, not like you. We can also play the dynamics, like this… Play freely. Still with pedal tone in E, As I mentioned earlier a pedal tone is when your playing is always coming back to the same note. For example: E E E E A E E E E B That makes the Es as the pedal tone. Just like a pedal on a bicycle which always goes back to the starting point before it repeats.